Search Results for: Queen Elizabeth

Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carrier – money well spent?

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As the first of two Queen Elizabeth-class carriers are named the question remains whether the 65,000t ships are value for money or if our rapidly shrinking defence budget should have been focussed on other things?

The carriers have been a long time coming. First conceived in the Strategic Defence Review (SDR) of 1998 a production contract was not signed for 10-years after the Labour government first delayed the programme adding to the cost and then the Coalition government switching back and forth between the F-35B and F-35C further adding to the cost.

Whilst the vessels could prove to be extremely valuable assets it is unlikely they will ever be used to their maximum capacity with the RAF operating the F-35B and reduced numbers of the aircraft being acquired. Have we invested over £6bn on glorified helicopter carriers? A decision about the future of the second ship has also yet to be made.

The construction of the carriers has been impressive, but should the Royal Navy have opted for something different?

The world according to Shephard: Week 6

There’s been plenty to catch the eye this week not least from the Singapore Air Show 2018.

In typical roving reporter style, the Shephard team based in Singapore has been filing copy and producing video content by the bucket load. For those of you that might have missed the big stories, the flight-line video is a good starting point, especially if you’re a fast jets aficionado – as the USMC Lockheed Martin F-35B made its first appearance in Southeast Asia.

Watch the team’s overview of what went on here:

 

But, if, like this writer, you want to see the rotary offerings, Beth Maundrill, senior reporter at Shephard, takes you through the Republic of Singapore Air Force’s fleet with some of its whirlybirds on display, see more details here.

Land-based news this week saw Shephard with a scoop brought to you by staff reporter, Alice Budge.

US support for Iraq’s fleet of M1 Abrams tanks is continuing despite acknowledgement from the US government that the vehicles have been deployed and used by an Iranian-backed militia.

Recent reports in Iraqi media outlets suggested that the US had suspended its maintainence support for the tanks at the end of last year after some were found in the hands of a militia known as the Popular Mobilisation Forces.

Iraqi soldiers conduct training with M1 Abrams tank

According to a US state department official, speaking to Shephard, the US is still committed to supporting the country’s security forces fleet.

Two highly in-depth opinion pieces were live this week. Firstly, the political positioning of the proposed construction of a Silk Road Economic Belt.

The Geobukseon states: ‘Commonly referred to as the…One Belt, One Road (OBOR), its broad agenda ranges from economic development to security enhancements and military defence expansion.

Moving from Asia to Europe, the second opinon piece this week, part of Shephard’s The Clarence series is on a recent UK government report that outlines the future of the country’s Amphibious Forces.

While it is sombre in tone with a focus on the cuts to the Royal Marines and the scrapping of HMS Albion and Bulwark – it does provide a reality check to the detrimental damage further cuts to personnel and loss of ships will do to national security.

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The US-based team has been attending shows and conferences in abundance, Scott Gourley has been attending West 2018 in San Diego, California.

He has been covering a wealth of news: from the upcoming deployment of the US Navy’s guided missile destroyer USS Milius highlighting the real world consequences of ongoing manning shortfalls to the development of an ‘autonomous data centre in a briefcase.’

From Washington, DC, Ashley Roque is at the Unmanned Systems conference and has drilled into details on the US military requiring industry’s help when it comes to more efficiently powering its unmanned systems.

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Lastly, and because it’s Friday, this week’s free-to-view analysis piece comes from editor, Grant Turnbull and land reporter Alice Budge on the companies posturing their wares to the British Army for its 8×8 vehicle with the army’s decision expected very soon.

Shephard looks closely at what is being laid on the table to the woo service to pick them.

 

Naval gazing into 2018

With the Surface Navy Association symposium underway, the start of 2018 has kicked off with a naval flare, both in the US and abroad, and many nations are now firmly fixed on enhancing their fleets.

Last year saw two incidents involving the US Navy’s USS McCain and USS Fitzgerald, the navy has gone on the record to say that these incidents were in fact preventable. The USN is now looking to learn from these harsh lessons and will start 2018 by trying to address some of the demands that come with a reduced fleet coupled with personnel working long hours.

Meanwhile, the plan for the USN going forward is looking to grow into to a 355-ship fleet from around 275 today. The Pentagon is set to release its FY19 budget request in February, it remains to be seen as to whether the navy will get what it wants.

Across the pond in the UK, the second Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carrier, the HMS Prince of Wales, touched water for the first time as its dry dock was flooded. The state of the UK’s Royal Navy remains a contentious issue and a recent criticism has come about as the MoD plans to sell HMS Ocean to Brazil not long after a recent, costly, refit of ‘Britain’s biggest warship’.

As the UK continues to work towards strengthening its fleet this week saw industry make another move on the UK Type 31 with Babcock and BMT announcing the Team 31 which now includes Thales, Ferguson Marine and Harland & Wolff shipyard. The team will bid for the UK’s Type 31e frigate project.

The MoD is hoping that the light frigate will eventually have export potential and it is continuing to work with BAE Systems on the export of the Type 26 global combat ship to potential customers including Canada and Australia. To date the UK has had little success in its naval export endeavours.

Finally, it has been noted that Chinese naval ambitions can no longer be ignored and the USN must face up to them

A recent report makes the case that the USN must address its weaknesses in the face of a China capable of destroying US ships and aircraft with its anti-access/area denial strategy.

In addition, it appears that China could be using foreign-held US debt to enhance its own capabilities. China will certainly be one to watch during 2018 as it continues to rapidly develop its defence capabilities.

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2017: a Shephard year in review

It has been quite the year for the Shephard Media editorial team and we have all certainly racked up the air miles.

We’ve also expanded the team, welcoming Alice Budge and Tim Martin on board as new reporters. Expanding our presence in the US we’ve also named Ashley Roque as North American Editor.

Now there’s time to take a look back at some of the news highlights from 2017 across the defence and aerospace world.

The year started off with the launch of a new helicopter concept in March as Bell Helicopter revealed the FCX-001 at Heli-Expo in Dallas. The new medium twin-sized aircraft, positioned as slightly bigger than the Bell 412 in length and in width. It will be interesting to see how Bell incorporates technologies from the FCX-001 into future designs and new aircraft.

Meanwhile, Turkish Aerospace Industries was flaunting its T129 at every opportunity, with appearances at Paris Air Show, Dubai Air Show and Defense and Security in Bangkok.

Speaking to Shephard at the Paris Air Show, the manufacturer of the T129 Atak and the T625 multirole helicopter said it is looking towards next year and considering the introduction of new platforms.

Meanwhile at sea, the UK designated 2017 as the year of the Royal Navy. With the first steel cutting of the Type 26 BAE Systems and the UK Government are now looking to export the vessel to the likes of Canada. The government is also focusing its efforts on export with the new and ongoing Type 31e (e for export, who’d have guessed) which will see the Royal Navy commission some new light frigates.  

Of course we could not ignore the developments of the Queen Elizabeth-class carrier. As the first of the two vessels has been commissioned questions surround the spend on the vessels and what this means for the future of shipbuilding. 

In the unmanned arena there has been progress on a couple of major military efforts, the first being the US Navy’s desire for a tanker refuelling UAV, known as the MQ-25 Stingray, in an unexpected announcement Northrop Grumman said it would no longer pursue the programme. Despite this Boeing recently unveiled its design for the programme.

On the ground the US Army continues to look for a load carrying robot under its Squad Multipurpose Equipment Transport (SMET) programme. The army ended the year by announcing that four UGVs would enter Phase II of SMET, which will begin in 2018. You can read full details of the final four here. 

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This year the team made its annual jaunt over the Washington DC for the AUSA Annual Meeting in October. Focuses for the US Army this year included the evolution of active protection systems with the service looking to speed up the acquisition of such a system for the in-service M1A2 Abrams tank.

Meanwhile, the French Army continued its revolution as it continues to make gains with the Scorpion modernisation programme. In the summer, Shephard got a close up look of the prototype during a visit to Nexter Systems facility in Satory, near Paris.

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Speaking of revolution, a quiet one may be underway in the defence industry as some of the largest players are beginning to adopt blockchain technology. This year saw the digital ledger technology increasingly being touted as the answer to challenges faced by ever more data-reliant and connected military establishments.

In the simulation and training arena we saw Northrop Grumman drop out of another programme, the US Air Force’s T-X effort to find an Advanced Pilot Training (APT) aircraft. Boeing, Leonardo DRS and Lockheed Martin remain in the race and 2018 should bring further developments.

Of course this just skims the surface of what the team has covered during 2017 and the events we have attended. All of the news content, magazines and videos from 2017 can of course be found on the Shephard Media website and we look forward to seeing you in 2018.

The World According to Shephard: Week 49

Pick of the week:

As Brexit negotiations rumble on in Brussels, Neil Thompson reported on the recent European Defence Industry Summit (EDIS). Designed to bring together speakers to discuss Europe’s security situation, European representatives were noticeably missing, with US-based Raytheon left to represent the European defence industry’s interests.

Obstacles to realising greater integration of European defence industries include funding, transparency with NATO and how to facilitate greater interoperability.

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The Clarence speaks

Despite the pomp and circumstance of the commissioning of HMS Queen Elizabeth, the future of UK shipbuilding is at a juncture. As HMS Queen Elizabeth enters service and construction on the Prince of Wales nears completion the challenge will be to maintain the skills developed throughout the programme. Another challenge, The Clarence argues, will be to retain the manpower and funds necessary to maintain and run the carriers.

Making a splash

The Royal Navy is not the only maritime force to welcome a new ship this week, the Pakistan Maritime Security Agency launched its fourth 600t Hingol-class maritime patrol vessel. The armed boat, which began construction in May 2016, will help patrol Pakistan’s EEZ, undertake maritime security and perform search and rescue missions.

Meanwhile Michal Jarocki reports from Warsaw on the renaissance of the Polish Navy as it celebrates its 99th anniversary with a commissioning ceremony for the ORP Ormoran (601) minehunter. The vessel is the first warship in over 20 years to be designed and built in Poland.

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The Canadian Surface Combat project has not seen such successes this week after encountering its latest rough patch. The Canadian government publicly rejected proposals not submitted through the formal process. The announcement followed a Naval Group statement in which it proposed an ‘off-the-shelf’ solution based on the FREMM frigate design to the Canadian government.

Drones dominate wish lists

The Indian military’s desire for UAVs will be boosted with further RfPs as the country aims for integrated army, navy and air force purchases of MALE and HALE UAVs. This demand is likely to be met through new industry activity, after Dynamic Technologies signed a cooperation agreement with IAI for the production, assembly and support of mini-UAVs in India.

Meanwhile, Poland has become the latest buyer of WB Group’s Warmate loitering munition. The UAS has received considerable interest from customers across the world and has already been used in combat. The Polish order includes 100 loitering munitions with deliveries expected to being in the coming weeks.

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Record rotary rates

Poland is not only in search of UAS, but is also perceived as a prime export market for Bell Helicopter’s AH-1ZViper. Bell is continuing its efforts to convince the Polish government that it will successfully execute the Polish military’s attack helicopter programme ‘Kruk’. Bell is also offering its UH-1Y Venom to fulfil the Polish Army’s requirement for a modern, multirole utility helicopter.

The AH-64E Apache Guardian is tipped to reach ‘historically high’ production figures of up to 100 aircraft a year by 2021. The projection is based on a ramping up of international orders which would see production rise from its current level of 70 platforms a year. Boeing expects to close a number of international sales within the next six months.

 

The movers and shakers of DSEI 2017

With thousands of exhibitors and two enormous exhibition halls chock full of technology, DSEI never disappoints when it comes to seeing new and interesting defence kit. The show, held at the London ExCel centre every two years, is a key date in the calendar for the industry and is used as an opportunity to bring out the big guns – literally.

The show is billed as a tri-service event, showcasing equipment from the land, sea and air domains, although like its Parisian equivalent – Eurosatory – there is a skew towards land capabilities.

Nevertheless, the event utilises the ExCel’s location next to the Thames to bring in several warships and have them berthed up during the week. The highlight this year being the Type 23 frigate HMS Argyll as well as LÉ Samuel Beckett from the Irish Naval Service.

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LÉ Samuel Beckett berthed next to the ExCel centre for DSEI 2017. (Photo: Grant Turnbull)

Mirroring an increase in focus by the UK government on naval capabilities, the DSEI event also had a strong maritime flavour to it this year. This was likely influenced by several key events before the show including the naming of the second Queen Elizabeth-class carrier HMS Prince of Wales, the release of the National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSbS) and contracts placed for the new Type 26 Global Combat Ship.

Ahead of the show, our roving reporter Beth Maundrill looked at how the NSbS was was aiming to overcome past mistakes in naval programmes that saw costs balloon and fleet sizes dwindle. Speaking at the event itself, Adm Philip Jones, First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff said he wanted to see the Royal Navy be ‘even faster and more agile’ in how it exploits technology advancements.

Industry is also positioning itself for a future Type 31 contract, with several companies unveiling potential designs at DSEI. Babcock showcased its Arrowhead 120 design, which is likely to compete against BMT Group for the Type 31e contract. Both companies will also be eyeing the export market, something that is being pushed in the new NSbS.

Another new naval technology unveiled at the show was the MBDA Dragonfire, part of a research programme with the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) that aims to explore the use of directed-energy weapons, better known as lasers, onboard vessels.

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A scale model example of the new Dragonfire, developed for the UK MoD by a team from MBDA and Leonardo. (Photo: Grant Turnbull)

Back on terra firma, it was British Army vehicle programmes that were taking up a lot of the focus. The service is currently recapitalising its fleet with both new build vehicles and upgrades. We got a little more clarity on the long-running Mechanised Infantry Vehicle programme, with an acquisition strategy now planned for later this year that will determine whether it is competed or sole-sourced.

Many companies brought along their 8×8 offerings to tempt the British Army. Unlike anything I’ve ever seen at a defence show, German company Rheinmetall rocked up with a Boxer 8×8 painted in the colours of the Union Jack. Gimmick or serious marketing strategy?

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Bit of a gimmick or a serious effort to make moves in the UK? (Photo: Rheinmetall)

Officials also gave a little more information on the Warrior upgrade programme, with a full production contract expected next year that will give the army a fleet of modernised ‘Warrior 2’ platforms. A Warrior on display at the show was also sporting a new camouflage, known as the Barracuda Mobile Camouflage System, which Shephard discovered had been ordered in small units by the British Army, with a potentially larger order expected.

It was also announced that the British Army’s flagship acquisition, the Ajax, has now begun manned live-firing trials, which should wrap up in around five months in time for delivery to the army.

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An upgraded Warrior vehicle on display at Lockheed Martin’s stand at DSEI, sporting a new camouflage system. (Photo: Grant Turnbull)

The UK defence secretary Michael Fallon also announced several contracts that aim to improve the capability of the British Army when it comes to protecting troops. These included a new EOD ground robot from Harris as well as a new £10 million initiative to study vehicle active protection systems, which is being led by Leonardo. The former programme, known as Icarus, could help the army develop technologies that effectively form a ‘shield’ around a vehicle to protect it against RPGs and anti-tank missiles.

Active protection systems are a significant topic of discussion at the moment, with several countries including China, Israel and Russia fielding some kind of capability. There is a worry among experts that the West will be left behind when it comes to utilising this kind of technology, with foreign APS-equipped vehicles potentially neutralising our current generation anti-tank capabilities.

Adding to this discourse, a BAE Systems CV90 was on display at the show that incorporated the IMI Systems Iron Fist APS technology – which will likely be fielded to the Dutch Army CV90 in the future.

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The IMI Systems Iron Fist active protection system on the turret of a CV9030 IFV at DSEI 2017. (Photo: Grant Turnbull)

Unsurprisingly, the UK-based BAE Systems took centre stage at DSEI, showing a huge array of its technologies across all domains. These technologies included the latest generation of its Broadsword soldier technologies currently undergoing evaluation with several foreign armies, as well as a new ‘Tactical Hotspot’ concept that provides voice and data communications in the most austere environments.

The company has also turned its hand to unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) with its Ironclad concept, which could be used for medical evacuation missions on the battlefield.

Indeed, the growing importance of unmanned systems was once again evident at DSEI this year with several innovations being displayed. BAE Systems also demonstrated its P950 RIB in an unmanned configuration.

Elsewhere, Qinetiq demonstrated a new configuration for its Titan UGV (developed in cooperation with Milrem and its THeMIS). Rheinmetall Canada, fresh from unveiling its new UGV concept earlier this year, came to DSEI to show an armed configuration for its multi-mission ground vehicle. Several other armed UGVs were on display this year, including Milrem’s THeMIS, which integrated a new FN Herstal .50 cal machine gun.

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Qinetiq’s Titan, which uses the THeMIS UGV from Estonian company Milrem, features several new integrations at this year’s DSEI. (Photo: Grant Turnbull)

That’s just a very tiny selection of what was making the headlines during the show, we have plenty more over at Shephard  for your reading and viewing pleasure.

The show was notable in that it had no real stand-out announcements or surprises, with a sense that many programmes and initiatives are continuing to tick over for the time being.

Many visitors will be optimistic about the market going forward, but the industry as a whole is still conscious of the uncertainty created by Brexit and the wider geostrategic environment.

The world according to Shephard: Week 35

​This week procurement, modernisation and deliveries dominate European defence news as the Shephard team gears up for MSPO, which kicks off in Poland on 5 September.

Turning to modernisation first, the Polish Army is embarking on a decade-long effort to modernise its artillery units, making them a pillar of the nation’s security. One of the most ambitious programmes is the procurement of Krab 155mm tracked self-propelled howitzers.

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Poland is also investing in an upgrade of its fleet of 4×4 light all-terrain vehicles with a number of procurement programmes. The aim is to replace legacy platforms with new vehicles within the next few years, which will better serve the needs of infantry, airborne, reconnaissance and special forces units.

Meanwhile, Romania is pursuing large-scale modernisation programmes, following the Romanian Supreme Council for National Defence’s decision to begin large-scale redevelopment of the country’s armed forces with a funding boost of €9.8 billion ($11.69 billion).

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Find Shephard’s full MSPO coverage on the show news site.

High in the sky

In rotary news this week, Pakistan’s Army Aviation Corps has received four Mi-35M attack helicopters after ordering the rotorcraft in a $153 million deal in August 2015. Pakistan aircrews are currently training on the aircraft, although it remains unclear what armaments and munitions Pakistan has opted for.

Across the border in India, the country’s fledgling helicopter industry received some reassuring news this week as the Ministry of Civil Aviation promoted helicopter operations in the second bidding phase for the Regional Connectivity Scheme, an attempt to encourage connectivity to smaller and remote towns.

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However, helicopter news from Poland is not so up-beat as its helicopter purchases continue, slowly. Despite being labelled as an ‘urgent requirement’, the second iteration of the Polish tender to meet urgent requirements for new helicopters for ASW/SAR and special operations forces has proved to be a prolonged process.

In the deep end

As the submarine market expands, Saab is seeking to tap into this growth as it reveals its new submarine models. Saab Kockums is predicting a demand for 80 new submarines to be replaced over the next 15 years.

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Closer to shore, Taiwan’s coast guard outlined a ten-year $1.7 billion buildup plan. The plan will see 141 cutters, including 12 coast guard versions of the Tuo Chiang-class catamaran joint the fleet by 2027.

According to Charles Au, the plan underscores Tsai Ing-wen administration’s intention to accelerate the capability of Taiwan’s maritime forces in the belief that the coast guard will serve as an auxiliary navy beneath the command of the Republic of China Navy (ROCN) in time of war.

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And on a visit to the Gulf the UK Defence Secretary secured the use of facilities at Duqm Port, Oman, as completion of the UK Joint Logistics Support Base at the port nears. The port provides Britain with a strategic asset in the Middle East and boasts dry dock facilities capable of accommodating submarines and HMS Queen Elizabeth.

Going ashore

Gordon Arthur reported on Australia’s embarrassing amphibious gap as it struggles to deliver its M1A1 AIM Abrams main battle tanks (MBT) ashore from the Royal Australian Navy’s Canberra-class landing helicopter dock (LHD) ships.

Gordon revealed that the LCM-1E landing craft embarked aboard the LHDs is struggling to handle the weight of the Abrams MBT.

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Asia tensions escalate

Alarmed by Kim Jong-un’s shenanigans in North Korea, such as the launch of a missile over Japan, the South Korean government in Seoul has announced a proposed boost to defence spending next year by 6.9%.

Over on the blog, Grant Turnbull, editor of Digital Battlespace, takes a look at ballistic missile defence technologies, which are receiving significant investment from the US and NATO. However these systems are not free of costs. Read more here.

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Finally, guest contributor to the blog, Sam Bocetta, takes an in depth look at the recent US-Japanese military exercise, Northern Viper, which underlined the close relationship between the US and Japanese militaries.

UK MoD orders 20 more carriers

It so transpires that the UK MoD has awarded a contract for 20 additional flattops ahead of a 31 January delivery next year.

While this might get the navgeeks running for their phones this time around the vessels supplied won’t be 280m, 70,000t behemoths. The decision instead is for smaller scale models destined for apparent distribution among key Foreign Office sites.

A contract award statement confirmed the purchase of 20 Queen Elizabeth carrier models ‘for presentation to British embassies’. The start of the build programme began on 10 August, which leaves a little more than five months to construct the fleet.

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A model of a Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carrier in the Cabinet Room of 10 Downing Street (Photo: Creative Commons)

Questions as yet unanswered include how the embassies might receive one of these prestigious models and what criteria any bid process is based on. Is it a raffle, a global game of rock-paper-scissors, or something more grown up?

The winner of the £30,000 programme of work, Wales-based David Fawcett, will see its workshop running to the maritime industrial drumbeat for the next few months in a bid to meet its deadline.

Information available on the company website state that it is ‘committed to providing the very best service’ and work with the latest technologies, including ‘3D CAD software and CNC machines, 3D printing machines and computer-generated photo etching’.

Quill has reached out to the model-maker for comment, although at the time of publishing none had been forthcoming.

A clause in the contract award did state that ‘the contractor shall not and shall ensure that any employee or subcontractor shall not communicate with representatives of the press, television, radio or other media on any matter concerning the contract’.

We might be waiting a while then.

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The new carriers will be strategically placed for maximum global impact (Photo: IMPS image library)

The world according to Shephard: Week 33

The glorious carrier?

This week UK defence news was dominated by the arrival of the Royal Navy’s new aircraft carrier the Queen Elizabeth at Portsmouth. For many it was a day of celebration and festivities that included a speech from the Prime Minister, Theresa May.

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However for Richard Thomas, editor of IMPS, the arrival of the carrier was met with a more measured tone. In an analysis of the costs and benefits of the carrier he asks ‘is it a waste of space?’ and investigates the sacrifices that have been made elsewhere in the navy for the colossal vessel.

Meanwhile, Beth Maundrill discusses the potentially embarrassing event in which a hobbyist drone landed on the deck of the £3 billion platform. The landing of a small, commercial (potentially a DJI Phantom) on the carrier raised serious questions relating to the security of the carrier against small unmanned threats.

 

The battle for maritime dominance continues

In other maritime news, this week the US Navy commissioned a replacement to the ageing Afloat Forward Staging Base Interim USS Ponce in a ceremony held at Khalifa bin Salman Port, Bahrain. The new Expeditionary Sea Base has been designed to provide logistics movement from sea to shore to support a range of maritime operations.

Is America’s maritime dominance under threat? Wendell Minnick took a look at the implications of China’s first overseas military base and naval support facility in Djibouti which he believes represents a challenge to American dominance in the region. Read Wendell’s full analysis here.

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China’s new base comes at a time of increasing maritime insecurity, as new offshore oil and gas finds off Africa’s coastline are drawing closer attention to the state of maritime security in the region.

 

Up, up and away

There has been surprisingly little sign of financial instability in the rotary industry as the largest helicopter OEMs have defied pessimists with steady Q1 and H1 results. While the industry still faces significant challenges and hurdles, such as gas price volatility and currency fluctuations, the four largest OEMs remain positive.

Helen Haxell takes a look at why we should all be feeling better about the future of the rotary industry. In her blog, Helen analyses some of the latest models coming onto the market and predicts a buoyant second half of 2017, with ‘good rotary times ahead.’

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One case study is that of Erickson, which has emerged from bankruptcy with energy and currently have their S-64 Aircranes deployed around the world fighting wildfires in the Northern and Southern hemispheres.

 

Acquisitions abound 

The Philippines have acquired six ScanEagles as part of a $7.4 million from the US Department of Defence.

While in the Middle East, Lebanon took delivery of the first batch of M2A2 Bradley Fighting Vehicles at a ceremony addressed by the US Ambassador to the country. The delivery comes at a time when the Lebanese army is on the offensive in the North of the country to oust ISIS fighters currently occupying territory in the barrens of Arsal.

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Finally, it’s all about the C-130 

This week it was announced that Honeywell will partner with Taiwan on the C-130 upgrade with technology transfer options from Honeywell to Taiwan’s state-owned AIDC for the air force’s C-130H Avionics Modernisation Programme.

There is also growing international interest in Lockheed Martin’s proposed C-130J-SOF export variant, which will be tailored to different operator’s requirements. Read more about the C-130J-SOF here.

Yokota Airmen are ready to the mission going

The Royal Navy’s new carrier – is it a waste of space?

 

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Beyond the hyperbole and hysteria that will greet the arrival of the Queen Elizabeth to Portsmouth, it’s worth bringing up its use as a platform and what has been sacrificed elsewhere in order to achieve this milestone.

Pushing around 70,000t at full load with a full complement of crew and aircraft, the carrier is without question the largest naval vessel ever to serve in the UK Royal Navy and a benchmark for the country’s return to maritime power.

Or not?

The two carriers, Queen Elizabeth and Prince of Wales, have topped the £6 billion mark to build and will soak up hundreds of naval service personnel from a hugely diminished pool. Capital ships being decommissioned are being cannibalised of their own crews to make up the numbers, while destroyers and frigates take it in turns to become alongside training ships on account of manpower shortages, equipment removals and engineering failures.

Capable as they are, only six T45 ADDs have entered service, down from 12 planned. These vessels have not been without their own controversies.

The 13 Type 23 frigates will be kept on beyond planned working lives because of delays to the Type 26 programme. Eight T26 will enter service, and be augmented by a yet-to-be designed and barely conceptual T31(e).

There has been no proper response from the UK MoD to Sir John Parker’s National Shipbuilding Strategy report.

Harpoon missiles fitted to the T23s and T45s will be retired next year leaving a national navy, that purports to be a blue water service, without ship-based ASuW capability. The scenes recently showing the Brazilian Navy dispatching the former HMS Brazen in a sinkex with a range of kinetic systems will be beyond replication by the RN from 2018.

The hard-used Ocean will leave. Albion and Bulwark take it in turns to sit mothballed. The SSN fleet will fall to six hulls as delays impact the planned one-out, one-in replacement of the Trafalgar’s with the Astute’s.

Embarked unmanned capabilities were removed this year from the frigate fleet amid cost crunches, a notion that the RN has done little to deny.

The new River Batch 2 OPVs will have to shoulder more of the maritime policing and low-end participatory duties the navy has to cover.

RFA Diligence, the only forward repair ship able to service RN ships, is unlikely to be replaced. One of the four Bay-class landing ship docks was sold after the 2010 ‘review’.

What has been missed after 2010 is an opportunity to mould the RN for the challenges of the 21st century. Can it create that onion-layer of security that a carrier strike group can work within? Will the carriers have the embarked capability necessary to fulfill their roles?

The navy has fewer hulls. Less amphibious capability. No ship-to-ship missiles. Fewer personnel. Less innovation. All for two big ships.

The carriers will slot into the US Navy’s demands, moving into the gaps created by its own CVN replacement programme and emerging challenges elsewhere. It’s an instrument of policy and bombast that could cause more harm to its service than good.

The service seems stripped of its core. Is it now an unbalanced bobblehead of an organisation standing on some pretty unsteady ground?

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